Vintage Chelsea Ships Bell Clock and Barometer Mounted on Wood Wall Plaque 1970s

Vintage Chelsea Ships Bell Clock and Barometer Mounted on Wood Wall Plaque 1970s
Vintage Chelsea Ships Bell Clock and Barometer Mounted on Wood Wall Plaque 1970s
Vintage Chelsea Ships Bell Clock and Barometer Mounted on Wood Wall Plaque 1970s
Vintage Chelsea Ships Bell Clock and Barometer Mounted on Wood Wall Plaque 1970s
Vintage Chelsea Ships Bell Clock and Barometer Mounted on Wood Wall Plaque 1970s
Vintage Chelsea Ships Bell Clock and Barometer Mounted on Wood Wall Plaque 1970s
Vintage Chelsea Ships Bell Clock and Barometer Mounted on Wood Wall Plaque 1970s
Vintage Chelsea Ships Bell Clock and Barometer Mounted on Wood Wall Plaque 1970s
Vintage Chelsea Ships Bell Clock and Barometer Mounted on Wood Wall Plaque 1970s
Vintage Chelsea Ships Bell Clock and Barometer Mounted on Wood Wall Plaque 1970s
Vintage Chelsea Ships Bell Clock and Barometer Mounted on Wood Wall Plaque 1970s
Vintage Chelsea Ships Bell Clock and Barometer Mounted on Wood Wall Plaque 1970s

Vintage Chelsea Ships Bell Clock and Barometer Mounted on Wood Wall Plaque 1970s
Vintage Chelsea Ships Bell Clock and Barometer Mounted on Wood Wall Plaque 1970s. Would make a great gift for a special occasion, or keep it for yourself!

Made by the Chelsea Company in Chelsea, MA near Boston. This is the 4-13/16 case size. The set appears to be from 1976 based upon the serial number of 805738 on the back of the clock case. Beautiful silver colored tin face on this clock. The numbering and minute markings are impressed into the tin.

"Chelsea" is noted in the middle of the face of the clock. The hands match and look appropriate to the clock.

The slow/fast adjustment wheel is in place on the face of the clock, and seems to work as well. The brass cases are all there.

No dings or dents to the metal cases. Does show some moderate lacquer loss to the case.

S, most notably on the top. The case has a screw off bezel. Glass is cracked on the barometer. The clock has an 8 day mechanical brass movement. The wind spring feels sound when keyed.

The clock will come with a vintage Chelsea impressed wind key. This set also comes with a Chelsea Barometer.

Beautiful silver tin face on that as well with impressed number. The indicator needle is in place and works. The glass is broken from being set down on the adjusting knob.

Glass replacement is readily available in the market place and thru qualified clock repair places that also handle glass. The clock face is 3.25 across. The two pieces are mounted on a nice hardwood wall plaque with a reddish stain to it.

Nice touch with a tack at the top middle to hold the key when not in use. Let us know if you have any questions or need additional pictures. The pictures provided both complement and supplement the listing description, so please look at them very closely as well.

With old items, there is no way one can capture all the little imperfections in words, so the two media are meant to be the full description. If you have not had experience with old mechanical clocks before, I would suggest you steer clear. One really needs to have the patience, and skill to work with these great works of art. They are not our modern plug in and go, or change the battery clocks.

Make sure that this clock meets your needs and requirements before deciding to acquire it. So again, ask all questions you have, come see in person or send a friend to see the clock on your behalf, prior to deciding to acquire it. Don't be shy, we are always open to reasonable suggestions! This clock is just waiting for the right collector out there to acquire and refurbish for their collection.

Some history about the Chelsea company from our friends at Wikipedia. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

Harvard Clock Company Boston Clock Company. The Chelsea Clock Company is an American clock. Manufacturing company founded in 1897. Clocks produced by Chelsea Clock Company have been found in the White House, on US Naval Ships, and in homes and offices around the world.

The company continues to build and repair clocks at their corporate headquarters in Chelsea, Massachusetts. Prior to 1880, Joseph Henry Eastman served as an apprentice of watchmaker to Edward Howard, founder of E. After serving his apprenticeship, Eastman would become one of the founders of Harvard Clock Company, starting as co-director alongside James H. Gerry, which was granted a Massachusetts Certificate of Organization on November 20, 1880. In the 1881 Boston City Directory however, Eastman was titled as General Manager. During this time, Harvard Clock Company produced 800 clocks of marine, carriage, banjo, and shelf types. The Harvard Clock Company would change its name to Boston Clock Company in 1884. Boston Clock Company continued to produce clocks like they did when they were Harvard Clock Company. However, in 1886, they began producing striking clocks after the invention of the Boston tandem wind movement.

They also began to produce ships bell clocks, although they were limited and appear to be prototypes. Circumstantial evidence shows these ships bell marked with Boston Clock Co. Were assembled at the Vermont Clock Company circa 1900. On January 31, 1894, the Jewelers Circular of Horological Review reported that the Ansonia Clock Company bought out the Boston Clock Company.

On September 4, 1895, The Circular reported that the Boston Clock Company was transferred to Charles O. The Ansonia Clock Company continued to offer Boston Clock Company clocks in their catalogue until late 1907. From 1894 to 1896, Joseph H. Eastman constructed a factory in Chelsea, Massachusetts, calling the new company Eastman Clock Company. Once completed, the Eastman Clock Company produced limited numbers of marine, regulator, and banjo clocks. However, shortly after the completion of the factory, Joseph Henry Eastman fell into bankruptcy. On May 1, 1896, a mechanics lien was recorded in Land Court against Eastman by J.

Ingalls on July 25, 1896. Joseph Eastman retained movements marked Eastman Clock Co. On October 7, 1896, Harry W Bates, with a small group of investors formed a clock company called Boston Clock Company of Maine in Kittery, Maine. This was done to succeed the defunct firm of the same name. However, by using the name Boston Clock Company as well as Eastmans factory and clock design, it led to confusion as to the origin of the Chelsea Clock Company.

In 1897, Charles Pearson, a native Bostonian, acquired the property, tools, and machinery and, within days, began operating it as the Chelsea Clock Company. The tools and machinery however were jury-rigged and badly worn.

Due to this, he set about expanding Chelsea's workforce and investing in major plant and equipment improvements. The first meeting of the Chelsea Clock Company Board of Directors occurred on July 28, 1897. On the board were Whipple N. Potter - President, Charles H. Pearson - Treasurer, Reginald Foster - Clerk and Allen L.

Chelsea Clock Company (1897 - 2015). Early production centered on pendulum models. And brass-plated, non-striking marine clocks. Pendulum clocks, with their fine mahogany cabinets, often took months to produce.

The company produced its marine clocks entirely in-house, so these created revenue far more quickly. Under Pearson's guidance, Chelsea made numerous product design improvements, many of which it patented. By 1903, the company also produced clocks for automobiles, soon counting Rolls Royce, Packard, and Studebaker among its customers. It wasn't until 1906, however, that the company earned its first profit.

Was by then ordering Chelsea's marine clocks in increasing quantities, leading other military branches to follow their lead. In 1907 and 1908, the U. Treasury Department ordered more than 100 clocks for its offices throughout the country.

This motivated Pearson to establish the Boston Clock Company, essentially a separate brand for clocks and related instrumentsincluding an artillery time fusethe company manufactured to meet government standards. From 1906 until the late 1920s, Chelsea's business grew profitably under Pearson's guidance. In 1928, however, he died following a brief illness. Neagle was quick to replace less popular models with new ones, including the Forecaster, Fulton, and Georgian.

Shortly after he assumed ownership, however, the stock market crashed and the Great Depression set in. Through drastic inventory and cost reductions Neagle managed to keep Chelsea afloat.

When World War II arrived, Chelsea's role as a government supplier helped offset declining consumer sales. In postwar 1946, the United States Air Force. Created its Strategic Air Command. (SAC) and equipped each if its bombers and nuclear missile silos with Chelsea clocks. Meanwhile, Mutz noted a growing demand for electric clocks. And, in 1947, introduced Chelsea's Model VE. He also introduced consumer versions of its popular military clocks, the Type "A" (12-hour) and Type "B" (24-hour). Mutz and King eventually discontinued several models, including the Athena, Fulton, and Magellan, while adding others, among them Bookends, Comet, and Corvette.

The redesigned movement, called the Model 4L, remains largely the same to this day. Soon thereafter, Chelsea's management noted the growing popularity of less expensive European movements, leading it to introduce a line of mid-priced clocks with German-made Hermle movements. Who, among many things, was the nation's largest producer of automotive clocks.

That same year, it also designed and introduced its first tide clock. He also resumed efforts to reserve the Chelsea brand name for the company's premium timepieces, and use the Boston brand for mid-line productsa practice he abandoned ten years later. By 1984, quartz and digital timekeeping technology were well established, leading Chelsea to introduce its Chronoquartz clock, named for its chronometer. A business consultant, entrepreneur, and longtime collector of Chelsea clocks.

In 2015, Chelsea Clock moved out, remaining in Chelsea, Massachusetts and making way for the old building to be demolished so the site can become part of an urban renewal project which will include mixed use of retail, commercial and residential units. Much of Chelsea's production today follows the 18th Century model of "cottage industry" in which pieces are made in various locations and brought together under the main company roof for final assembly, so less space was needed to house the company workshops and offices.

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We appreciate your taking the time to visit our store, and hope you will provide us feedback that will enable us to make your shopping experience the best it can be. The item "Vintage Chelsea Ships Bell Clock and Barometer Mounted on Wood Wall Plaque 1970s" is in sale since Thursday, March 30, 2017. This item is in the category "Collectibles\Clocks\Vintage (1930-69)\Wall". The seller is "hallboys321" and is located in Wilmington, Delaware. This item can be shipped to North, South, or Latin America, all countries in Europe, all countries in continental Asia.


Vintage Chelsea Ships Bell Clock and Barometer Mounted on Wood Wall Plaque 1970s


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